Different note, an octave apart, have the same tone.We cannot live only for ourselves. A thousand fibers connect us with our fellow men. - Herman Melville
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Law Of Octaves

Different note, an octave apart, have the same tone.

The Musical Law of Octaves states that, in the musical sense, notes of different frequencies have the same "tone" or musical quality. You can easily experiment with this by playing various notes on a piano. Notice that all the C notes or all the G# notes have the same sound.

This fact of music is so important that it is probably responsible for the note naming convention in music.

You can find more out about the scientific reasoning and use of the Law of Octaves in our sound physics section.

 


Sound


Longitudinal Wavelength Sound Waves Pitch and Frequency Speed of Sound Doppler Effect Sound Intensity and Decibels Sound Wave Interference Beat Frequencies Binaural Beat Frequencies Sound Resonance and Natural Resonant Frequency Natural Resonance Quality (Q) Forced Vibration Frequency Entrainment Vibrational Modes Standing Waves Law of Octaves Psychoacoustics Tacoma Narrows Bridge Schumann Resonance Animal BioAcoustics More on Sound

Music


Law Of Octaves Sound Harmonics Western Musical Chords Musical Scales Musical Intervals Musical Mathematical Terminology Music of the Spheres Fibonacci Sequence Circle of Fifths Pythagorean Comma

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